Woman sparks fury after performing dance routine with woodland BEAR

Influencer’s controversial statement sparks debate after dismissing sleep as a practice for the less affluent, igniting a wave of shock and criticism.
Influencer's controversial statement sparks debate after dismissing sleep as a practice for the less affluent, igniting a wave of shock and criticism.
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A Russian woman has sparked fury after performing a dance routine with a bear in a forest.

The clip shows the blonde woman performing the routine to a version of Lady Gaga’s ‘Bloody Mary’ in the snow.

As she struts her stuff in a fetching black and red tartan getup, the bear performs hand movements while sitting on the icy ground.

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The video was shared on X by MMA heavyweight fighter Malcolm FleX on 1 May.

The post went viral with 4 million views and hundreds of comments, as reported by Need To Know.

He wrote: “Russians have a special pact with bears in that region that allows them to do this.

“You will most certainly get mauled if you are not Russian.”

One fan commented: “If you check Russian DNA, there is bound to be some bear in there.”

Social media comment on the post of Influencer's controversial statement sparks debate after dismissing sleep as a practice for the less affluent, igniting a wave of shock and criticism.
Social media comment on the post. (Picture: Jam Press)

Another wrote: “They didn’t show the last part where the bear ate her!”

“Shhh, Darwin needs more award recipients,” said someone else.

Jack joked: “That’s just your basic Russian citizenship test.”

Social media comment on the post of Influencer's controversial statement sparks debate after dismissing sleep as a practice for the less affluent, igniting a wave of shock and criticism.
Social media comment on the post. (Picture: Jam Press)

Mage remarked: “She doesn’t have enough meat on her bones to interest that bear.”

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